Γυμναζόμαστε!

[πηγή: youtube 30 Minute Metabolism Booster with Celebrity Trainer Kit Rich]
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O were my love yon Lilac fair

O were my love yon Lilac fair,
Wi’ purple blossoms to the Spring,
And I, a bird to shelter there,
When wearied on my little wing!
How I wad mourn when it was torn
By Autumn wild, and Winter rude!
But I wad sing on wanton wing,
When youthfu’ May its bloom renew’d.
O gin my love were yon red rose,
That grows upon the castle wa’;
And I myself a drap o’ dew,
Into her bonie breast to fa’!
O there, beyond expression blest,
I’d feast on beauty a’ the night;
Seal’d on her silk-saft faulds to rest,
Till fley’d awa by Phoebus‘ light!

Robert Burns (17591796)

 
[πηγή: youtube Ron Swanson Visits Lagavulin Distillery – Parks and Recreation – Parks and Recreation]

Gortoz a ran (I’m waiting)

Gortozet ‘m eus, gortozet pell
E skeud teñval tourioù gell
E skeud teñval tourioù gell

I was waiting, waiting for a long time
In the dark shadow of grey towers
In the dark shadow of grey towers

E skeud teñval an tourioù glav
C’hwi am gwelo ‘c’hortoz atav
C’hwi am gwelo ‘c’hortoz atav

In the dark shadow of rain towers
You will see me waiting forever
You will see me waiting forever

Un deiz a vo ‘teuio en-dro
Dreist ar maezioù, dreist ar morioù

One day it will come back
Over the lands, over the seas

‘Teuio en-dro an avel c’hlas
Da analañ va c’halon c’hloaz’t

The blue wind will return
And take back with it my wounded heart

Kaset e vin diouzh e alan
Pell gant ar red, hervez ‘deus c’hoant

I will be pulled away by its breath
Far away in the stream, wherever it wishes

Hervez ‘deus c’hoant pell eus ar bed
Etre ar mor hag ar stered

Wherever it wishes, far away from this world
Between the sea and the stars

[via]

[πηγή: youtube I’m Breaking Up with You Forever – SOUTH PARK]

Η Μάχη των Θερμοπυλών

Πολλές μάχες έχουν γίνει στις Θερμοπύλες και ίσως ξαναγίνουν. Η διάσημη όμως είναι εκείνη του 480 π.Χ. μεταξύ των Ελλήνων και των Περσών, κατά την δεύτερη περσική εισβολή στην Ελλάδα.

Η μάχη των Θερμοπυλών αποτελεί μια από τις πιο σημαντικές μάχες στην ελληνική και στην παγκόσμια ιστορία. Κυρίως όμως από ηθική άποψη είναι λαμπρό παράδειγμα αυταπάρνησης, αυτοθυσίας και υπακοής στην πατρίδα. Η μάχη έδειξε τα πλεονεκτήματα της στρατιωτικής εκπαίδευσης των Σπαρτιατών, του καλύτερου εξοπλισμού και της έξυπνης χρήσης της διαμόρφωσης του εδάφους.

Δείτε στο παρακάτω βίντεο μια ενδιαφέρουσα αναπαράσταση της μάχης.

[πηγή: youtube Thermopylae 11:32 Σκηνοθεσία: Martin Andrée, Σενάριο: Martin Andrée, Πάυλος Κουλούρης, Ιωάννης Αρβανίτης, Αφήγηση: Νέστορας Κοψίδας. Παραγωγή: Ϊδρυμα Μείζονος Ελληνισμού]

I can add colours to the chameleon

I’ll make my heaven to dream upon the crown,
And, whiles I live, to account this world but hell,
Until my mis-shaped trunk that bears this head
Be round impaled with a glorious crown.
And yet I know not how to get the crown,
For many lives stand between me and home:
And I,–like one lost in a thorny wood,
That rends the thorns and is rent with the thorns,
Seeking a way and straying from the way;
Not knowing how to find the open air,
But toiling desperately to find it out,–
Torment myself to catch the English crown:
And from that torment I will free myself,
Or hew my way out with a bloody axe.
Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile,
And cry ‘Content’ to that which grieves my heart,
And wet my cheeks with artificial tears,
And frame my face to all occasions.
I’ll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall;
I’ll slay more gazers than the basilisk;
I’ll play the orator as well as Nestor,
Deceive more slily than Ulysses could,
And, like a Sinon, take another Troy.
I can add colours to the chameleon,
Change shapes with Proteus for advantages,
And set the murderous Machiavel to school.
Can I do this, and cannot get a crown?
Tut, were it farther off, I’ll pluck it down.

Exit

GLOUCESTER The Third part of King Henry the Sixth, Act 3, Scene 2, William Shakespeare

[πηγή: youtube Ralph Fiennes plays Richard III: ‘I can add colours to the chameleon’ – Guardian Culture]

Our revels now are ended

Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

Prospero, The Tempest, Act 4 Scene 1 William Shakespeare

[πηγή: youtube David Threlfall as Prospero in The Tempest: ‘Our revels now are ended’ | Shakespeare Solos – Guardian Culture]

Friends, Romans, countrymen

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest–
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men–
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

Mark Antony, Julius Caesar (Act 3, Scene 2, lines 73-108)

[πηγή: youtube Damian Lewis as Antony in Julius Caesar: ‘Friends, Romans, countrymen’ | Shakespeare Solos – Guardian Culture]

The quality of mercy

The quality of mercy is not strained.
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
‘Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The thronèd monarch better than his crown.
His scepter shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptered sway.
It is enthronèd in the hearts of kings;
It is an attribute to God Himself;
And earthly power doth then show likest God’s
When mercy seasons justice. Therefore,
Though justice be thy plea, consider this:
That in the course of justice none of us
Should see salvation. We do pray for mercy,
And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much
To mitigate the justice of thy plea,
Which, if thou follow, this strict court of Venice
Must needs give sentence ‘gainst the merchant there.

— Portia, in William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act 4, Scene 1.

[πηγή: youtube Laura Carmichael as Portia: ‘The quality of mercy’ | Shakespeare Solos – Guardian Culture]